Monday Motivator: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

“Light tomorrow
with today!”

— Elizabeth Barrett Browning

◊ ◊ ◊

On December 10, 1845, Robert Browning wrote a letter Elizabeth Barrett, a well-known poet who had praised the younger writer’s work in print.

The letter opens with Mr. Browning’s gushing praise. “I love your verses with all my heart, dear Miss Barrett — and this is no off-hand complimentary letter that I shall write.”

The gushing continues.  “I do, as I say, love these books with all my heart — and I love you too.”

Cheeky!

Writers today might call security over that last line, but the next day, Miss Barrett, who was bedridden with respiratory illness and six years older than Mr. Browning, wrote to a friend, saying Browning’s letter “threw me into ecstasies.”

That’s how England’s greatest literary love affair began and we are all richer for it.  Although Barrett’s tyrannical father refused to allow any of his 12 children to marry, Elizabeth and Robert carried out their romance in secret and eloped four years later.  Her father refused to see her again.

During their secret courtship, Elizabeth wrote “Sonnets from the Portuguese,” which includes the now practically cliched line, “How do I love thee, let me count the ways.”

If you haven’t had the good fortune to read the most famous love poem of all time, here it is.  Enjoy.

Sonnets from the Portuguese, XLII
How do I love thee?  Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
— Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Monday Motivator is a weekly quote posted to encourage, inspire, and motivate writers of all skill levels and across genres.  I’d love suggestions if you have a favorite quote to share.  Click here to see past Monday Motivators.

Resources:  The Brownings,Robert Browning’s letter, Sonnets from the Portuguese (free download all e-book formats), PostADay2011
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6 thoughts on “Monday Motivator: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

  1. Fantastic post Olivia, I just love the Brownings, both the story of their life together and their work.

    One of my favorite quotes was said by one of my favorite writers, Virginia Woolf: “Language is wine upon the lips.” There is so much meaning in those few words.

    You probably already know about this site, but if not, check it out, I think you’d enjoy it: BrainyQuote http://www.brainyquote.com/ There are quotes by many, many people, artists and (unfortunately in my opinion) celebrities.

    Thanks for a wonderful post!

  2. Ooooooooo, I just learned about Elizabeth and Robert’s story in English last semester, and I was surprised I’d never heard it before. It’s very sweet, and Elizabeth definitely got some good poetry out it.

  3. I’m lucky enough to own a two volume set of Elizabeth and Robert’s letters to each other, they are first editions and were sold to me years ago by an English professor who knew I loved them but had little money. He charged me next to nothing, which was so kind of him. I remember him saying he just wanted someone to have them that appreciated them and two weeks later he died. I can’t help but think of him everytime I look at those books. Great blog, I haven’t been here before.

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